Last edited by Zulukasa
Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

1 edition of Women migrant workers in China"s economic reform found in the catalog.

Women migrant workers in China"s economic reform

Feng Xu

Women migrant workers in China"s economic reform

by Feng Xu

  • 242 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by St. Martin"s Press in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Labor & Industrial Relations,
  • Labor,
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE,
  • Economic policy,
  • Women,
  • Employment,
  • BUSINESS & ECONOMICS,
  • Migrant labor

  • Edition Notes

    StatementFeng Xu
    SeriesInternational political economy series, International political economy series
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHD5856.C5 X8 2000eb
    The Physical Object
    Format[electronic resource] /
    Pagination1 online resource (xv, 239 p.)
    Number of Pages239
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25553303M
    ISBN 100333978099
    ISBN 109780333978092
    OCLC/WorldCa48139653

      In major cities on China’s east coast, migrant workers spend, on average, about $ a month on rent for less than 16 square meters (about square feet) of space, plus a . "This book lucidly exposes the underside of the Chinese economic miracle, revealing the plight of the migrant laborers who are part of the world’s largest working class. Drawing on rich ethnographic data as well as careful political and economic analysis, Pun Ngai examines the conditions these workers face daily both on the job and in the.

    In the industrial district of Nanshan in Shenzhen, 80 percent of the migrant workers were women. A preference for younger women over older women has led to a predominantly young population of migrant workers. Married women have more restrictions on mobility due to duties to the family, whereas younger women are more likely to not be al mortality (per ,): 37 ().   China’s Complicated Relationship With Workers’ Rights The Editors Wednesday, Jan. 25, Editor’s note: This article is the first in an ongoing WPR series about workers' rights in various.

      China’s economic miracle over the past plus years owes much of its success to the country’s internal migrants — rural residents who streamed to the cities en masse to work in China’s Author: Shannon Tiezzi.   Some of today's migrant workers are "second generation" -- the sons and daughters of the first generation of migrant workers. Most were born after China introduced a .


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Women migrant workers in China"s economic reform by Feng Xu Download PDF EPUB FB2

Women Migrant Workers in China's Economic Reform studies unmarried women migrant workers in China. As international migrants in China's richest province, they work in silk, one of China's oldest and most symbolically-charged : F.

Women Migrant Workers in China's Economic Reform studies unmarried women migrant workers in China. As international migrants in China's richest province, they work in silk, one of China's oldest and most symbolically-charged : F.

Women Migrant Workers in China's Economic Reform studies unmarried women migrant workers in China. As international migrants in China's richest province, they work in silk, one of China's oldest and most symbolically-charged industries.

"Women Migrant Workers in China's Economic Reform introduces the reader to an intriguing micocosm of China's recent economic reform. Free 2-day shipping.

Buy International Political Economy: Women Migrant Workers in China's Economic Reform (Hardcover) at "This book lucidly exposes the underside of the Chinese economic miracle, revealing the plight of the migrant laborers who are part of the world’s largest working class.

Drawing on rich ethnographic data as well as careful political and economic analysis, Pun Ngai examines the conditions these workers face daily both on the job and in the Format: Paperback.

The report also reviews the current migrant governance frameworks at national and regional level, providing actionable evidence-based policy recommendations to benefit from women’s labour mobility, provide fair and equitable migration opportunities for women, and enhance regional social and economic.

The increase in demand for workers in highly feminized sectors (e.g. health care, domestic work, entertainment, manufacturing and textiles) in many destination countries (particularly Hong Kong, Malaysia and Singapore) results in an increased number of women migrant workers.[3] This, along with the lack of available full–time employment for men, leads to more women taking up work as migrant.

Economic reform in China has resulted in a widening gap between the rich and the poor, and urban poverty has emerged as a key factor which may affect future : Pengyu Zhu. Migrants, especially migrant women, have higher labour force participation rates ( per cent) than non-migrants ( per cent).

Almost every sixth domestic worker in the world is an international migrant, and women make up per cent of international migrant domestic workers. Rural Migrant Workers in China: Scenario, Challenges and Public Policy 1.

Introduction Through the s, China remained primarily an agricultural economy, with the majority of its population living in rural areas. Inwhen China launched its economic reform, its rural population accounted for 82 per cent of the total by:   China's rural migrant workers deserve more respect from the city-dwellers Since Deng Xiaoping's reform and opening-up "The million-strong migrant workforce drives China's economy.

Jenny Chan and Mark Selden. “The Labour Politics of China’s Rural Migrant Workers.” Pp. in Chinese Labour in the Global Economy: Capitalist Exploitation and Strategies of.

Executive Summary. China’s hukou (household registration) system has imposed strict limits on ordinary Chinese citizens changing their permanent place of residence since it was instituted in the s.

Beginning with the reform period in the late s and accelerating during the late s, national and local authorities relaxed restrictions on obtaining urban residence permits.

This part of the book includes translations of seven stories written by rural migrant women about their experiences of migration and work in the city. These were contributed to a story-writing competition with the theme “my life as a migrant worker” (wo de dagong shengya), organized by the journal Rural Women Knowing All (Nongjianü Baishitong).

women’s economic opportunities. Jobs associated with women, such as domestic work, should be regulated. To best advance migrant women’s rights, women’s political participation should be supported.

Migrant women’s human rights must be protected, and migrants must have access to File Size: KB. Women Migrant Workers puts forward a compelling case for the immediate reform of immigration and employment laws and policies in receiving nations so that women migrant workers from the global south employed in so-called low-skilled, low-waged occupations or undocumented workers are not subject to discrimination and marginalization.

The book. Internal migration in the People's Republic of China is one of the most extensive in the world according to the International Labour Organization. This is because migrants in China are commonly members of a floating population, which refers primarily to migrants in China without local household registration status through the Chinese Hukou system.

In general, rural-urban migrant workers are. The statistic shows the number of migrant workers in China from to Inthere were almost 76 million migrant workers in China who had left their homes to find work. In a new book, former China correspondent Dexter Roberts argues that the divide between China's urban elites and migrant workers is a threat to the country's : Mary Hui.

Women migrant workers and remittances Remittances and their potential to contribute to development are becoming a central focus of global migration governance.

With women making up approximately half of all migrant workers globally, there is a shifting focus of many policies and programmes to include remittances sent by women.Since the start of the economic reform and opening up three decades ago, about million farmers have left their rural homes and travelled across the country in search of work.

Rural workers.Background. Over the past three decades, China’s economic development has produced the largest human migration in history, leading to a rise in urban population from million into million in []—an increase driven largely by rural-to-urban migrant workers, those who migrate from rural areas of their original hukou (household registration) to urban areas for jobs or better Cited by: